• Home
  • Wild & Scenic Films - 2019

Wild & Scenic Films - 2019

First Showing - Evening - February 22

A New View of the Moon (3 minutes). 
Become reacquainted with awe alongside strangers interacting with a telescope trained on the moon. Watch as Wylie Overstreet takes a telescope around the streets of Los Angeles to give passersby an up-close look at a familiar object: a new view of the moon.

Brotherhood of Skiing (10 minutes).
Since 1973, the National Brotherhood of Skiers has overcome barriers by bringing soul and smiles to the mountain. Formed during the height of the black power movement, the organization is dedicated to creating a welcoming space for people of color on the slopes and supporting black youth in snowsports. Today, the NBS hosts the largest gathering of black skiers in the United States and represents 53 ski clubs with over 3,000 members across the country.

Kokota: The Islet of Hope (29 minutes).
Mbarouk Mussa Omar is from a small East African Island called Pemba. Nearly ten years ago, he visited a tiny neighboring islet called Kokota and was shocked by what he saw. Kokota was teetering towards collapse, and Mbarouk knew climate change and deforestation were the culprits. He desperately wanted to help Kokota, but what could one poor man from Pemba possibly do? Kokota: The Islet of Hope tells the story of Mbarouk’s quest to save the islet and shows the positive impact that small groups of dedicated individuals can have on large communities.

Tracking Snow (5 minutes).
Discover a novel way of studying elusive carnivores…using snow! Join two scientists – Jessie and Tommy – as they re-purpose an old technique in a way that not only revolutionizes how we study threatened species and manage our landscapes, but also highlights the importance of collaboration in conservation.

Ashes to Ashes (16 minutes). 

A small community in Northeast Alabama. A mayor whose town sits on the river’s banks. A businessman in the Mobile Bay. All are impacted by coal ash, a pollution by-product of burning coal, in Alabama.  Billions of tons of ash are stored in unlined pits alongside our rivers and streams causing harmful pollution such as mercury, arsenic, and many other heavy metals to be dumped into waterways where we fish, swim, and drink. Ashes to Ashes tells the story of coal ash in Alabama and what you can do to call on the electric utility companies to become leaders by cleaning up the pollution they have created.


Flipping the Switch (6 minutes). 

LeeAnne Walters led a citizens’ movement that tested the tap water in Flint, Michigan, and exposed the Flint water crisis. The results showed that one in six homes had lead levels in water that exceeded the EPA’s safety threshold. Walters’ persistence compelled the local, state, and federal governments to take action and ensure that residents of Flint have access to clean water. 

Clay Bolt (4 minutes).
Clay Bolt is a natural history and conservation photographer for World Wildlife Fund and has been featured in prominent magazines such as National Geographic. Affectionately referred to as the bug guy, Clay explains how and why he focuses on 99% of life on earth that is smaller than your finger.

Second Showing - Evening - March 8

Our National Parks belong to everyone.  So why are they so white? (5 minutes).
Only 20 percent of visitors to National Parks are people of color. As the broader conservation movement continues to struggle with diversity and inclusion, many worry that the Trump administration will only make things worse. Watch our video to learn about the troubling history of public lands and to meet the conservationists of color who are trying to change the parks’ future.

Sacred Strides (12 minutes).
Bears Ears National Monument is one of the most talked-about public lands under threat, though the dialogue often glosses over how sacred it is to many Native Americans. In March 2018, a group of tribes put their differences aside and came together to run 800 miles to Bears Ears – and to send a message of unity. The Sacred Strides for Healing Prayer Run wove from tribal homelands across the Southwest to Bears Ears. Watch to meet the people who are participating in the public lands conversation with their feet and learn about why this land is so important to them.

Greenland Melts (4 minutes).
Dr. Konrad Steffen, the Swiss climate scientist whose research propelled Al Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth” and “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power”, reveals his alarming findings around glacial melt impacts on global sea level rise, climate change, and mass migration. Greenland Melts is stunningly filmed at remote polar monitoring stations where Dr. Steffen has been tracking the melting of the Greenlandic Ice Sheet for over 25 years.

Our Last Trash (20 minutes).
The film highlights the current global recycling crisis and the adverse effects of disposable plastics on the environment. Our Last Trash explores the meaning of a “zero waste” lifestyle, and how some individuals are combating this plastic issue one reusable item at a time. Colorful animations and riveting interviews reveal how we can create a more sustainable planet.

Chandalar (15 minutes).

On a clear morning in Portland, Oregon, fourteen youth with oversized backpacks await a long day of travel. Along with five veterans, a few volunteers and “Axe the Service Dog,” they are headed to Fairbanks, Alaska. From there they will pile into bush planes and fly into the Arctic Circle.  This is Soul River, a non-profit organization founded by decorated Navy veteran Chad Brown, and their three-week deployment to the Chandalar River is the culmination of outdoor conservation education, collective strengthening, leadership development, healing, and a whole lot of fly fishing.

If They Build It, What Will Come (12 minutes).

The Cahaba River is one of the Southeast’s most iconic river systems. Urban sprawl in the state’s largest metropolitan area has already placed a great strain on this important river system and now the proposed Cahaba Beach Road threatens to destroy the area along the Little Cahaba River that is the drinking water source for hundreds of thousands of people in the area. This film exposes the risk of building a road across an important forested stretch of river and how citizens and watershed groups are fighting to protect this precious resource.

Cowboys and Scientists (8 minutes).
Thirty years ago, a partnership between Archbold Biological Station and Buck Island Ranch inspired a new mission: cowboys and scientists working together to advance scientific discovery on a ten thousand acre working cattle ranch in Florida’s Northern Everglades. Bridging this cultural divide has resulted in a series of transformative discoveries that have begun to reshape our misconceptions about agriculture, sustainability, and conservation in the 21st century.

Third Showing - Afternoon - March 9

Rodents of Unusual Size (71 minutes).

Hard-headed Louisiana fisherman Thomas Gonzales doesn’t know what will hit him next. After decades of hurricanes and oil spills he faces a new threat – hordes of monstrous 20 pound swamp rats. Known as “nutria”, these invasive South American rodents breed faster than the roving squads of hunters can control them. And with their orange teeth and voracious appetite they are eating up the coastal wetlands that protects Thomas and his town of Delacroix Island from hurricanes. But the people who have lived here for generations are not the type of folks who will give up without a fight. Thomas and a pack of lively bounty hunters are hellbent on saving Louisiana before it dissolves beneath their feet. It is man vs. rodent. May the best mammal win.


    Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software